My Digital Photography of

Centipedes and Millipedes

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Millipedes

 

Millipede, unknown species #3

Waterloo, Eddy Discovery Center, May 21, 2017

   

     

Waterloo, Eddy Discovery Center, May 31, 2013

     

     

     

     

 

 

Millipede, unknown species #2

Maybury State Park, July 17, 2016

     

     

     

Lake Orion, MI, July 7, 2013

   

   

White Lake, MI, September 15, 2012

   

   

   

   

 

 

Millipede, unknown species #1

November 8, 2009

I photographed this millipede on a large maple leaf, then released it.  The millipede was about 3.5 centimeters.  It was very difficult to get the whole thing in one photo because it moved surprisingly fast.  I would just get it located and focused in the viewfinder and then it would be gone.  I basically had to move the camera with the millipede as it walked.

     

     

     

     

   

 

 

 

Centipedes

 

House Centipedes, Scutigera coleoptrata

This house centipede is probably quite old (they live to be about 5 years old) and battered (missing legs and antenna).  It is supposed to have 15 pairs of legs.  It was very willing to let me take photographs of it.  I have never seen one this close up before.  In the first photo, you can even see the eye facets---they are known to have very good vision.  Many people are afraid of these because they look so scary, but they aren't like the more dangerous red centipedes that can sting---these are harmless and one of the best things you can have in your house to get rid of other unwanted pests!  House centipedes feed on spiders, arthropods and other bugs in your house, so they are good to have around.  I let this one go back in the house to do its job after its photo shoot on 5-4-08.

    

   

     

     

     

 

This house centipede was found on Devil's Night 2008.  What a nice surprise!  Its antenna and legs were all intact except the third left leg.  In fact, I couldn't even get the whole insect in the camera's viewfinder because of its long appendages.  I was excited to see that I actually captured the facets in its eyes.  I assumed they had compound eyes because they seem to have such excellent vision, but I have never seen it through the eyes of a camera until now.

     

   

   

 

 

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